Newsletter #3

One of the core goals of my platform is to advance educational equity. I believe it is a fundamental right to have access to education; that is why I am committed to eliminating barriers in accessing quality education. Cambridge is wealthier than the average city in America, but is also home to pockets of poverty. In our public schools, roughly 45% of Cambridge public school students can be considered low-income. I want to work towards making sure that financial instability does not hinder educational, extracurricular, and social experiences in schools. This goal trickles into combatting any sort of racial or gender inequality as well.

I am committed to

  • Making pre-kindergarten programs more accessible
  • Improving existing out-of-school opportunities and creating new ones
  • Starting a city-wide book exchange
  • Implementing more technology into schools
  • Providing job trainings and other post high-school opportunities
  • Supporting underprivileged students inside AND outside of the classroom

 

Cambridge Constituents

Cambridge Constituents is a photography campaign that aims to share the voices and inputs of our constituents. The interactions we have with other Cantabrigians directly influence how we develop our policy platform.

 

"As a student who didn't have a laptop throughout high school, I found myself going out of my way or struggling to complete simple homework. I definitely would have benefited from having a computer or laptop at home. I think there should be more funding for students who don't have the finances to buy laptops and other expensive materials (i.e. graphing calculators). The high school staff could be more accepting and helpful when it comes to students who don't have the resources that other more privileged students have. Despite Cambridge's wealth of diversity, we often forget most families live in the middle class genre and even below the poverty line. As a society of conscious and accepting individuals, we should be more empathetic when it comes to the Achievement Gap/Wealth Gap especially considering there's such a huge discrepancy right here in Cambridge." - Karalynn (CRLS Graduate '16)

"As a student who didn't have a laptop throughout high school, I found myself going out of my way or struggling to complete simple homework. I definitely would have benefited from having a computer or laptop at home. I think there should be more funding for students who don't have the finances to buy laptops and other expensive materials (i.e. graphing calculators). The high school staff could be more accepting and helpful when it comes to students who don't have the resources that other more privileged students have. Despite Cambridge's wealth of diversity, we often forget most families live in the middle class genre and even below the poverty line. As a society of conscious and accepting individuals, we should be more empathetic when it comes to the Achievement Gap/Wealth Gap especially considering there's such a huge discrepancy right here in Cambridge." - Karalynn (CRLS Graduate '16)

My Response

Every student deserves to be equipped with the skills and resources necessary to thrive in the 21st Century; this begins with equitable access to computers. I support the “one-to-one” technology initiative that provides Chromebook laptops to 9th and 10th grade classrooms. The total cost, $20,000, is equivalent to one full-time staff member. Therefore, I believe in working with the School Committee Budget to invest in more technology. From early development to graduation day, it is vital for the children in our community to receive equal opportunities throughout all the schools.

It is unfair to hold students to the same standard if some lack access to technology at home. Technology not only aids students in learning and developing useful skills but also eases instruction for teachers. By providing the same resources, such as books, technology, and other tools, to all students, we can work towards leading children of all backgrounds to success.